What are Oxford admission tests?

The University of Oxford has been ranked the 2nd best university in the UK according to The Complete University Guide and The Guardian in 2023. Notably, it has been ranked as the best university in the world by Times Higher Education. Therefore it should come as no surprise that Oxford University has a rigorous admissions process for its courses. 

In 2022, 23,819 applications were made to Oxford University, however, only 3,645 offers were made! Beyond its impressive rankings, Oxford’s commitment to academic excellence makes its admissions process particularly selective, as shown by the high rejection rates. 

This is why, here at The Profs, we have an excellent history of increasing the average Oxbridge acceptance rate from 15% to a notable 55%. That’s what makes our admissions test experts perfect to guide you through the process and help you receive the best possible outcome.

From our experience, we’ve noticed that many students struggle with tailoring their approach to maximise their scores on Oxford’s admissions tests! Well, don’t worry, we’re here to offer the right support and preparation to help you elevate your test scores and increase your chances of receiving an offer. Reach out sooner rather than later!

If you’re aiming to secure a spot at one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious universities, it’s crucial to understand what these tests are all about. This article will guide you through various admissions tests that are required for different Oxford courses and how you can maximise your scores in these tests. 

Keep reading for expert advice on Oxford University’s admissions tests.

Content

What is an admissions test?

An admissions test is a prerequisite assessment that you may be required to sit as part of your application process, depending on the course you have chosen. Some tests assess general aptitude and critical thinking skills, whilst others focus on subject-specific knowledge. 

The content of the admissions test will vary widely depending on your course, and this article will include course-specific requirements at Oxford University. Moreover, the content and structure of admissions tests are tailored to the unique demands of each academic programme. Admissions tests serve as a supplementary measure to academic qualifications and help universities assess candidates on a more standardised basis.

Don’t get caught out by the challenging nature of these admissions tests, reach out to our expert Oxbridge admissions test tutors!

Why does Oxford use admissions tests?

The University of Oxford typically requires admissions tests as part of its application process to allow a thorough and fair assessment of prospective students. Oxford University becomes inundated with thousands of applicants per application cycle, and they require information beyond your academic grades and your personal statement. The use of admissions tests at Oxford University also allows academics to identify candidates with exceptional potential who may not have had the opportunity to showcase their abilities through conventional academic metrics alone. 

The subject-specific components of these tests further allow Oxford University to tailor its selection process to the unique requirements of different academic programmes, ensuring that admitted students possess the foundational understanding necessary for success in their chosen course. 

What admissions tests does Oxford use?

Below is an overview of the different tests that Oxford University uses as part of its selection process:

UCAT (University Clinical Aptitude Test): This assessment has been used by many universities worldwide for admission to multiple Medical undergraduate degrees. Oxford is replacing the BMAT with the UCAT. It is joining the large number of universities that use UCAT (administered by Pearson VUE) in the next application cycle for 2025 entry. This should put some much-needed ease on Medicine applicants applying to a variety of universities alongside Oxford! 

Similar to the LNAT, the UCAT is a computer-based assessment that does not require any subject-specific knowledge. Instead, the UCAT is a 2-hour test split into 5 sections all with multiple choice questions testing your verbal reasoning, decision making, quantitative reasoning, abstract reasoning, and situational judgement. Not all of these titles will make much sense so for more information and access to test resources you should check out the UCAT website.

For more insider tips and advice on how to get started with UCAT read our blog on ‘How to Prepare for the UCAT’. We also have experienced UCAT tutors on hand to support you in preparing for this unique test!

CAT (Classics Admissions Test): The CAT consists of three individual computer-based tests: the Latin Translation Test, the Greek Translation Test, and the Classics Language Aptitude Test (CLAT). Each paper will last 1 hour, and it is sat under timed exam conditions. For the Greek and Latin translation tests, you will be given a short passage in prose or verse, and you will be required to translate it into English. You will not be permitted to take in dictionaries, grammar books or notes. For the Classics Language Aptitude Test, you will be required to analyse how languages work, which does not require knowledge of any specific language. The papers you will be required to take will depend on the course you intend to apply for and whether you are studying Latin or Greek A level equivalent.

Contact our expert CAT tutors for tailored 1-to-1 support to have the best outcome! Read this article on ‘How to Prepare for the CAT’ for more detailed information.

GAT (Geography Admissions Test): The GAT is a computer-based test which lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes under timed conditions. It is split into parts A, B, and C. Part A assesses your critical thinking skills and consists of two subsections where you will be required to read a passage and answer multiple-choice questions. It should roughly take you 30 minutes. Part B assesses your problem-solving skills and also has two subsections where you will be required to read some information, followed by multiple-choice questions.  This section should also take you 45 minutes. Part C will require you to read a piece of text and answer an essay question. This section should take you the longest, around 45 minutes.

Check out ‘What is the GAT? A Guide to Oxford’s Geography Admissions Test’ to get more insight. Contact The Profs expert GAT tutors for tailored support today!

HAT (History Admissions Test): The HAT is a computer-based test that lasts one hour under timed exam conditions. This test is a test of your skills, not knowledge. It will consist of one question based on a specific extract from a source. You will be assessed on your ability to read carefully and critically, adopt an analytical approach, answer questions relevantly, handle concepts adeptly, select evidence to support points effectively, showcase originality and independence, and maintain precision and clarity in writing are essential skills for academic success.

Reach out to our expert HAT tutors today, don’t leave it too late! Also, check out our blog on preparing for the HAT to gain a wider understanding.

LNAT (National Admissions Test for Law): The LNAT is a computer-based test that lasts 2 hours and 15 minutes under timed exam conditions. It is divided into two sections, A and B. Section A is a multiple-choice format which includes 42 questions which are based on 12 passages (3 or 4 questions per passage). You will be allowed 95 minutes to answer this section. Section B requires you to write one essay out of three different options. You will be given 40 minutes for this section. The LNAT does not test your law knowledge, but instead your aptitude for studying Law.

Reach out to our expert LNAT tutors to ensure that you reach your full potential! Also, check out ‘How to Prepare for the LNAT’ for more comprehensive information.

MAT (Mathematics Admissions Test): The MAT lasts 2 hours and 30 minutes, and is sat under timed exam conditions. It is a hybrid test in which you will answer computer-based questions, but also paper booklet questions. It aims to test your depth of mathematical understanding rather than a broad range of knowledge. The questions require you to apply mathematical knowledge and techniques from a syllabus that roughly corresponds to year 12 content (or equivalent), with a few additional topics from A level Maths (or equivalent).

Take a few minutes to read ‘How to Prepare for the MAT’ to get a more detailed understanding of the nature of this admissions test.

We also have expert tutors for the MAT, reach out today!

MLAT (Modern Languages Admissions Test): The MLAT is a computer-based test that consists of 10 sections. The sections you are required to take will be dependent on the course that you’re applying for. The tests consist of eight distinct sections, each dedicated to a specific language: Czech, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Alongside these, there are two different sections: the Language Aptitude Test (LAT), designed for those undertaking a new language or applying specifically for Russian, and the Philosophy test: tailored for students applying for Philosophy and Modern Languages. The Philosophy section extends over 60 minutes, whilst each of the other language sections is allocated a 30-minute duration.

We have various tutors who are experts in the MLAT, reach out today! Also, check out ‘How to Prepare for the MLAT.’

PAT (Physics Admissions Test): The PAT is a hybrid test, requiring you to answer both online questions and paper booklet questions, which last for 2 hours under timed exam conditions. The PAT is structured for those who have completed the first year of A level (or its equivalent) in Mathematics and Physics. It requires you to answer subject matter questions comparable to what is covered in the GCSE and A level syllabus.

Read ‘How to Prepare for the PAT’ for a more detailed overview! Do not hesitate to contact our expert PAT tutors.

Philosophy Test: The Philosophy Test is a computer-based test which lasts for 60 minutes and is sat under timed exam questions. It will test your philosophical reasoning ability and you will not be required to study philosophy to take this test. Typically, you will be required to complete a comprehension exercise and write a short essay or answer a structured question. Tutors will typically look for you to be precise and provide reasoning in your answers. Avoid stating your opinion without using evidence to support it.

Read ‘How to Prepare for the Philosophy test’ for more information. Also, reach out to our expert Philosophy test tutors for specialist guidance.

TSA (Thinking Skills Assessment): The TSA is a 2-hour paper-based test that is divided into two parts. Section 1 is 90 minutes and is made up of multiple-choice questions assessing your problem-solving skills, numerical reasoning, critical thinking, understanding and reasoning with arguments. Section 2 lasts 30 minutes and is a writing task. It will require you to organise your ideas concisely and coherently, conveying your thoughts effectively in writing. The questions are not subject-specific, and you will have a choice of four questions.

We have many expert tutors for the TSA. Reach out sooner rather than later! Also, check out ‘How to Prepare for the TSA’ for more information.

Music performance test: If you are shortlisted for an interview after your application, you will be asked by admissions to email a 5-minute continuous video of a musical performance on your chosen instrument/voice.

Reach out to our expert music performance tutors for specialist advice and guidance!

Reach out to our Oxbridge admissions test experts today to get a personalised understanding of the process and structures of the test you will be required to take!

Which courses at Oxford require an admissions test

CourseAdmissions testTest format
  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Medicine
  • Medicine (Graduate entry)
UCAT (University Clinical Aptitude test).A computer-based single 2-hour test split into 5 subtests which are scored separately:

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Decision Making
  • Quantitative Reasoning
  • Abstract Reasoning
  • Situational Judgement 

The time allocation between the subtests is not equal. See the UCAT website for more information.

  • Classics
  • Classics and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
CAT (Classics Admissions Tests).CAT:

1. Latin Translation Test.

2. Greek Translation Test.

  • Passage given in prose or verse.
  • Translate into English.

3. Classics Language Aptitude Test (CLAT).

  • Analyse language structure.
  • No specific language knowledge required.
  • The paper you take will depend on your intended course.

Duration: each test lasts 1 hour.

  • Classics and English 
CAT (Classics Admissions Tests).CAT:

1. Latin Translation Test.

2. Greek Translation Test.

  • Passage given in prose or verse.
  • Translate into English.

3. Classics Language Aptitude Test (CLAT).

  • Analyse language structure.
  • No specific language knowledge required.
  • The paper you take will depend on your intended course.

Duration: each test lasts 1 hour.

  • Classics and Modern Languages
CAT (Classics Admissions Tests).

MLAT (Modern Languages Admissions Test).

CAT:

1. Latin Translation Test.

2. Greek Translation Test.

  • Passage given in prose or verse.
  • Translate into English.

3. Classics Language Aptitude Test (CLAT).

  • Analyse language structure.
  • No specific language knowledge required.
  • The paper you take will depend on your intended course.

Duration: each test lasts 1 hour.

MLAT: 

1. Computer-based test.

  • 10 sections in total and those required depend on the applied course.
  • 8 language sections (course dependent, pick the one suitable for your course): Czech, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

2. Additional Sections:

  • Language Aptitude Test (LAT) for new language learners or Russian applicants.
  • Philosophy test for Philosophy and Modern Languages applicants.

Language Sections Duration: 30 minutes each.

Philosophy Section Duration: 60 minutes.

  • Computer Science
  • Computer Science and Philosophy
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics and Computer Science
  • Mathematics and Philosophy
  • Mathematics and Statistics.
MAT (Mathematics Admissions Test).MAT: 

  • Hybrid Test: Combination of computer-based and paper booklet questions. Test depth of mathematical understanding
  • Content: Requires application of mathematical knowledge and techniques.
  • Syllabus corresponds roughly to year 12 content ( or equivalent). Includes a few additional topics from A level Maths.

Duration: 2 hours and 30 minutes.

  • English and Modern Languages
 

MLAT (Modern Languages Admissions Test).

MLAT: 

1. Computer-based test.

  • 10 sections in total and those required depend on the applied course.
  • 8 language sections (course dependent, pick the one suitable for your course): Czech, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

2. Additional Sections:

  • Language Aptitude Test (LAT) for new language learners or Russian applicants.
  • Philosophy test for Philosophy and Modern Languages applicants.

Language Sections Duration: 30 minutes each.

Philosophy Section Duration: 60 minutes.

  • European and Middle Eastern Languages
MLAT (Modern Languages Admissions Test).MLAT: 

1. Computer-based test.

  • 10 sections in total and those required depend on the applied course.
  • 8 language sections (course dependent, pick the one suitable for your course): Czech, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

2. Additional Sections:

  • Language Aptitude Test (LAT) for new language learners or Russian applicants.
  • Philosophy test for Philosophy and Modern Languages applicants.

Language Sections Duration: 30 minutes each.

Philosophy Section Duration: 60 minutes.

  • Geography 
GAT (Geography Admissions Test).GAT:

Computer-based, duration with 3 sections:

1. Part A (Critical Thinking): 

  • Two subsections.
  • Read passages, and answer multiple-choice questions.

Duration: approximately 30 minutes.

2. Part B (Problem Solving): 

  • Two subsections.
  • Read information, and answer multiple-choice questions.

Duration: approximately 45 minutes.

3. Part C (Essay):

  • Read text, and answer essay question.

Duration: 45 minutes.

  • History
  • History (Ancient and Modern)
  • History and Politics
HAT (History Admissions Test).HAT:

  • Computer-based test.
  • Skills-based, not knowledge-focused.
  • One question based on a specific extract.

Skills evaluated include:

  • Careful and critical reading.
  • Analytical approach.
  • Relevant question answering.
  • Concept handling.
  • Effective evidence selection.
  • Originality and independence.
  • Precision and clarity in writing.

Duration: 1 hour.

  • History and Economics 
HAT (History Admissions Test).

TSA (Thinking Skills Assessment).

HAT:

  • Computer-based test.
  • Skills-based, not knowledge-focused.
  • One question based on a specific extract.

Skills evaluated include:

  • Careful and critical reading.
  • Analytical approach.
  • Relevant question answering.
  • Concept handling.
  • Effective evidence selection.
  • Originality and independence.
  • Precision and clarity in writing.

Duration: 1 hour.

TSA:

Paper-based test, 2 sections:

1. Section 1 (90 minutes): 

  • Multiple-choice questions.
  • Assess problem-solving skills, numerical reasoning, critical thinking, understanding and reasoning with arguments.

2. Section 2 (30 minutes):

  • Writing task from a choice of four questions.
  • Organise ideas concisely and coherently.
  • Convey thoughts effectively in writing.

Duration total: 2 hours.

  • History and English 
HAT (History Admissions Test).HAT:

  • Computer-based test.
  • Skills-based, not knowledge-focused.
  • One question based on a specific extract.

Skills evaluated include:

  • Careful and critical reading.
  • Analytical approach.
  • Relevant question answering.
  • Concept handling.
  • Effective evidence selection.
  • Originality and independence.
  • Precision and clarity in writing.

Duration: 1 hour.

  • History and Modern Languages
HAT (History Admissions Test).

MLAT (Modern Languages Admissions Test).

HAT:

  • Computer-based test.
  • Skills-based, not knowledge-focused.
  • One question based on a specific extract.

Skills evaluated include:

  • Careful and critical reading.
  • Analytical approach.
  • Relevant question answering.
  • Concept handling.
  • Effective evidence selection.
  • Originality and independence.
  • Precision and clarity in writing.

Duration: 1 hour.

MLAT: 

1. Computer-based test.

  • 10 sections in total and those required depend on the applied course.
  • 8 language sections (course dependent, pick the one suitable for your course): Czech, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

2. Additional Sections:

  • Language Aptitude Test (LAT) for new language learners or Russian applicants.
  • Philosophy test for Philosophy and Modern Languages applicants.

Language Sections Duration: 30 minutes each.

Philosophy Section Duration: 60 minutes.

  • Law (Jurisprudence)
  • Law with Law Studies in Europe
LNAT (National Admissions Test for Law).LNAT:

Computer-based, three sections: 

1. Section A (Multiple Choice):

  • 42 questions based on 12 passages. 3 or 4 questions per passage.
  • Allowed time: 95 minutes.

2. Section B (Essay):

  • Write one essay from three options.
  • Allowed time: 40 minutes.

Total duration: 2 hours and 15 minutes.

  • Materials Science
  • Physics
  • Physics and Philosophy 
  • Engineering Science
PAT (Physics Admissions Test).PAT: 

Hybrid test, online questions and paper booklet questions.

  • Questions cover subject matter comparable to GCSE and A level syllabus ( or equivalent)  in Mathematics and Physics. 

Duration: 2 hours.

  • Modern Languages 
  • Modern Languages and Linguistics 
  • Philosophy and Modern Languages 
MLAT (Modern Languages Admissions Test).MLAT: 

1. Computer-based test.

  • 10 sections in total and those required depend on the applied course.
  • 8 language sections (course dependent, pick the one suitable for your course): Czech, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

2. Additional Sections:

  • Language Aptitude Test (LAT) for new language learners or Russian applicants.
  • Philosophy test for Philosophy and Modern Languages applicants.

Language Sections Duration: 30 minutes each.

Philosophy Section Duration: 60 minutes.

  • Music
Music Performance Test.You will be required to email a 5-minute continuous video of a musical performance on your chosen instrument/voice.
  • Philosophy and Theology
Philosophy Test.Philosophy Test:

  • Computer-based.
  • Comprehension exercise. 
  • Short essay or structured question.
  • Tests your philosophical reasoning ability. 
  • Not required to have studied philosophy beforehand.

Duration: 60 minutes.

  • Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE)
  • Psychology (Experimental)
  • Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics
  • Human Sciences
  • Economics and Management
TSA (Thinking Skills Assessment).TSA:

Paper-based test, 2 sections:

1. Section 1 (90 minutes): 

  • Multiple-choice questions.
  • Assess problem-solving skills, numerical reasoning, critical thinking, understanding and reasoning with arguments.

2. Section 2 (30 minutes):

  • Writing task from a choice of four questions.
  • Organise ideas concisely and coherently.
  • Convey thoughts effectively in writing.

Duration total: 2 hours.

Please also be aware that, depending on your chosen course, you may not be required to complete all sections of the admissions test, so make sure you check the full requirements of your course on Oxford’s course requirements.

6 tips for preparing for the Oxford admissions test

1. Find out which test is required and when before applying

Make sure you do thorough research into which test your course will require before you begin applying. Some courses, for example, History and Modern Languages, will require more than one admissions test. Similarly, some tests, like music, will not require registration, but most courses will require you to register for your admissions test before the deadline for the application for your course. 

Enrolment doesn’t happen automatically, and simply completing your UCAS application won’t sign you up for the test. You can’t enrol yourself; instead, you need to go through an authorised Cambridge Assessment Admissions Testing (CAAT) centre. This is usually your own school or college, but it could also be an approved open test centre. 

Make sure you are also aware of any registration deadlines. For Oxford Admissions tests, you must typically register in September (except for the LNAT). Tests can run from various cycles throughout the year. However, Oxford University will only accept October sessions for the CAT, GAT, MAT, HAT, MLAT, PAT, TSA, and Philosophy tests.

So, for example, in the 2024 cycle, you would register to take the CAT test between 1st-29th September, and you will sit the test either at your school/college or at a test centre on 19th October 2024. 

Find out if your school is authorised to be a test centre, and if not you can look here to find your nearest open test centre. As the LNAT is not an Oxford-specific test, their dates run slightly differently. For Oxford applications, you can usually register and book your LNAT between August and September and take your test by a deadline in October. 

Reach out to our Oxbridge admissions test experts today to be ahead of other applicants and be as prepared as you can for the process!

2. Have an ideal score in mind

Even though the scoring for each test can be slightly confusing, make sure you have an ideal score in mind. Make sure you research the scoring systems for the test/s you will be required to take. 

For example, LNAT scoring is out of 42, which includes the score of section A (multiple choice). The test centre does not mark the essay component (section B) but instead sends it to tutors at Oxford within your desired course. 

Even though Oxford University does not have a specific benchmark that they look for, the shortlisting average score for the 2021/22 cycle was 27.26 marks, and the offer average score was 28.34. Having an idea of what averages look like for shortlisting and offers for previous cycles can enable you to have your benchmark.

Whatever your ideal score is, The Profs can help you achieve it, contact our expert  admission test tutors today!

3. Leave plenty of time to prepare

You must allocate a significant amount of time for thorough preparation. These tests are well-known for their challenging nature, demanding a deep understanding of the subject matter (depending on the test, it may not always require subject knowledge) and an ability for critical thinking and problem-solving on your part.

Your preparation should involve: 

  • Familiarising yourself with the specific format and content of the tests.
  • Practising under timed conditions.
  • Honing the skills necessary to excel in each section.

Leaving plenty of time to prepare will allow you to identify your strengths and weaknesses and tailor your study plans accordingly. Moreover, leaving a significant amount of time for preparation will enable you to seek additional resources, such as sample questions, past papers, and expert guidance, all contributing to a more comprehensive and practical study strategy. Adopting a proactive approach and dedicating time to your preparation can enhance your chances of success and showcase your academic prowess during the Oxford admissions process.

Additionally, dedicating time to your preparation enables you to manage the stress and anxiety associated with these assessments, where the outcome is significant for your application process. Oxford admissions tests are known for their intensity, and having a well-structured study plan allows you to build confidence and competence gradually. It also allows you to revisit challenging areas and reinforce understanding, ultimately fostering a sense of preparedness crucial for success in such competitive examinations.

Our expert Oxbridge admission test tutors can provide a personalised approach while giving you invaluable first-hand advice, given that many of the team members at The Profs are Oxford graduates. Do not leave it too late; be ahead of the game!

4. Get to know the format and specification of the test

Regardless of the particular admissions test or tests you are undertaking, you must be aware of the structure you will be presented with. Avoid getting into the test and being shocked and unaware of the structure and sections the test will contain. The exam layout should feel like second nature as soon as you start the test. 

Aside from the layout’s nature, ensure you are also aware of the test specification and marking criteria. For example, suppose you are applying for a history-related course and undertaking the HAT. In that case, the marking criteria will focus on your ability to read carefully and critically, adopt an analytical approach, answer questions relevantly, handle concepts adeptly, select evidence to support points effectively, showcase originality and independence, and maintain precision and clarity in writing are essential skills for academic success. Once you know these marking points, you can tackle and demonstrate them effectively throughout the test, maximising your score. 

Check out Oxford University’s admissions test page, where you can look at specific tests and their preparation guide, which includes all the relevant information.

5. Practise past papers under timed conditions 

One of the most effective strategies is to engage in timed practice using past papers to understand the admissions test layout better. By simulating exam conditions during these practice sessions, you get a genuine feel for the actual examination day and improve your time management skills, a critical component for success in these rigorous exams. This method will give you further insights into the types of questions you will be required to answer and the expected complexity levels. 

Delving into past papers grants you a comprehensive view, allowing you to refine your revision strategies and pinpoint areas for improvement. Furthermore, it is a diagnostic tool that showcases your strengths and weaknesses. For instance, if you consistently score lower in section 1 of the TSA compared to section 2, it signals a need to focus on enhancing your problem-solving skills, numerical reasoning, critical thinking, understanding and reasoning with arguments, rather than your writing skills. This targeted approach not only aids in strategic preparation but also maximises your performance potential on exam day.

Reach out to our Oxbridge admission test tutors for personalised guidance on optimising your preparation through effective use of past papers.

6. Work with an admissions test expert

Sometimes, it can be challenging to know where to begin in terms of preparation for the admissions tests. This can often lead to students leaving preparation to the very last minute. To avoid this, work with an Oxford University admissions test expert. 

By working with an expert admissions test tutor, you can benefit in many ways and maximise your outcome: 

  • Tailored approach to your needs: An experienced Oxford University admissions test tutor at The Profs can assess your strengths and weaknesses, providing targeted guidance that aligns with your needs. This personalised approach will ensure that you and the tutor can continually refine and adapt your revision and preparation for your revision journey.
  • In-depth insight into test structure and format: With firsthand experience in the admissions process, an expert tutor possesses a comprehensive understanding of the specific requirements, format, and nuances of the admissions tests. By working with an expert tutor, you can gain tailored advice from first-hand experience that you can effectively implement into your approach. This insight will enable you to navigate the exams more confidently and strategically.
  • Realistic practice with performance analysis: Expert tutors at The Profs can simulate exam conditions by offering access to practical mock tests. You will also receive detailed feedback on performance, coupled with constructive analysis, which will help you identify areas for improvement, refine strategies, and gauge your readiness for the exams. This practice contributes to increased familiarity with the testing environment, reducing stress on exam day.

Take the next step towards success by contacting our Oxbridge admission test tutors, who can provide expert advice and guidance throughout your preparation process. Don’t hesitate to contact our team today and elevate your preparation. Become another one of our success stories!

Get 1-to-1 guidance from an expert admissions test tutor 

Admissions tests, especially for Oxford University, can prove to be very challenging for applicants. Therefore, it is important to devote a lot of time and preparation to them. Here at The Profs, we uphold an Oxbridge success rate that is 3x the national average. So, if anyone knows how to maximise your chances of smashing the admission tests and getting an offer, it’s us. 

Here at The Profs, we are committed to excellence by maintaining an impeccable network of tutors with only a 3% acceptance rate, ensuring that our students receive an outstanding level of tuition. In fact, more than 95% of our applicants secure offers from their preferred universities at the undergraduate level. Reach out to our Oxbridge admissions test tutors today!

FAQs

How do I register for the tests?

If you are applying for the LNAT for a law-related course, registration and administration is conducted by Pearson VUE, and you should register for your test on the LNAT registration website. It involves two steps: setting up your online account, registering your details, and booking and paying for your test. 

Note that if you require special arrangements for your test before booking and paying, follow the instructions on the LNAT website here

You should visit the website of the platform running your test to book your slot, either online or at a nearby test centre.

For the UCAT, create an account which typically opens in May the year before entry e.g. accounts for new applicants for 2024 entry could be made from 16th May 2023. Book your test through your account from June. The key dates are regularly updated on the UCAT website

As of 2023, Cambridge Assessment Admissions Testing no longer runs tests. CAAT previously ran CAT, MLAT, MAT, PAT, HAT, and the Philosophy Test. All these tests, including the GAT, will be administered by Tata Consultancy Services (TCS). If your school/college has not registered as a TCS test centre, you can look for an authorised open centre here. Also, check out TCS’s handbook for registration for further information.

When do I have to take the tests?

Tests typically run in October; however, exact dates can vary from year to year. For example, for 2023, the dates for Oxford’s CAT, GAT and MAT were on 18th October, and for the HAT, MLAT, PAT and Philosophy tests, they took place on 20th October. The CAAT administered tests, BMAT and TSA, were also on 18th October. 

For the LNAT test, they have multiple testing slots; however, for Oxford’s 2023 admission cycle, the deadline was the 16th of October. 

Make sure you are aware of the registration deadlines (typically in September) and the date of your actual exam. If you miss either, your application for that year will be invalid.

How much do I have to pay for Oxford’s admissions tests?

Test Price
LNAT£75 at test centres within the UK and the EU.

£120 for test centres outside of the UK and the EU.

BMAT£70 within the UK and EU.

£115 outside of the EU.

  • TSA
  • MLAT
  • CAT
  • HAT
  • PAT
  • GAT
  • MAT
  • Philosophy Test
No charge though some independent test centres may charge you an administration fee for the TSA Oxford, covering the cost of invigilation and room hire which is essential for running the test. So it is important to contact your specific exam centre for more information.
Music practicalNo charge.

Check out ‘How to Prepare for the UCAT’ to get a better understanding of this admissions test. Contact our expert UCAT tutors for tailored advice and guidance

How do I take the tests as an international applicant?

If you are an international student, you will be required to demonstrate your English language proficiency, and if you meet the requirements, you will be offered a place. For more information on the specific English language requirements, check out the English language requirements information page on the Oxford University website. 

If you are an international student applying for the LNAT, check the live test centre locator to find your nearest test centre. For the MLAT, CAT, HAT, PAT, GAT, MAT, and Philosophy Test, visit the registration portal on Oxford’s official site to locate your nearest test centre if your school/college is not authorised as a test centre.